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and finally, they were adopted when the united nations declaration of human rights was put in force after world war ii. thanks in part to eleanor roosevelt who helped draft the declaration after her husband's death. virtually every industrialized nation has taken a step to industrialize these rights and have some kind of health coverage for their citizens with some major exceptions are you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. tell us what you think about this programming this weekend. you can tweet us at apple tv and comment and send us an e-mail. booktv, nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> up next, "after words" with james hershberg and the international history project. we will have david coleman and his a list work, "the fourteenth day: jfk and the aftermath of the cuban missile crisis." he is the director of the miller center and he details the what happened on october 22, 1962. president kennedy walked a fine diplomatic line to remove weaponry from cuba. >> host: david, most of us are focused on those 13 days back in 1969. you are focusing on the aftermat
. and that -- you notice the united nations does not have, does not give the nations that right, particularly because the lessons from the league of nations. and they, he -- the congress said they would gladly redesign the league. in fact, the european nations all said just ask us, we'll remove that. rerefuseed -- he refused. he simply, and the republicans knew that he was that rigid in his nature, and they just selected that, and they just played it to their success. very definitely. yes. there's a question back there. >> it's entirely possible that barack obama may win the electoral vote and may either lose the popular vote or the popular vote may be very close. what effect is that likely to have on his performance in the second term? >> the implication is the weakness that he has. and it's likely that at best if he wins, he will have a small majority in either the electoral college or the popular vote. so that would add to the congressional, the republican position that they don't have to cooperate with the man who doesn't have a mandate. and the mandate is the thing that would, would be o
aggressive tactics. lou: and despite the involvement of united nations secretary general it could turn into the operation the israelis threatened in a matter of. >> that certainly is a possibility. whose supplies hamas? iran. look at the conflict. egypt has a hand from morsi and the disastrous economic policies. but taking on the nuclear issue, of face it. iran his benetton war over 34 years. was just another active for firing on the unmanned drone. they did not come forth to meet the challenge. lou: as you point* out the national media i ran in this context not take note of the president's agenda and the absence of china on the specific. >> . we appreciate talking to you. adjoining is now is congressman gohmert just reelected to a fifth term on the homeland security and serving as chief justice of the court appeals. starting with the fiscal cliff talking about a special prosecutor with benghazi of the speaker makes it clear he will approach and a sheet -- negotiation positively with some sense of accommodation if his terms are met. that is pretty positive? >> there is a lot of pressu
, despite the involvement of the united nations secretary general and others, trying to mediate, it looks like this could turn into a ground operation which the israelis have threatened within a matter of days. what is your outlook? >> i think that is certainly a possibility. but you have to step back for a minute. who supplies hamas? it is iran. you have to look at iran's role in this current conflict. certainly, egypt has a hand for mohammed morsi and his disastrous economic policy. but what it has done is taken the nuclear issue off of the table. let's face it, iran has been at war for over 33 years. they conducted another act of war just a week or so ago when they fired an unmanned drone. as usual, we did not come forth to meet the challenge. lou: thank you very much. as you point out, the national media and in this context of the context between israel and hamas, taking note of the president's agenda and the absence of china on this specific event. admiral, we always appreciate talking to you. lou: joining us now is congressman louie gohmert. he was just reelected to a fifth term and
and provocative acts in the persian gulf. in letters to the united nations, iran said the navy repeatedly violated its air space. the iranian ambassador claims u.s. jets and drones have flown over the country, disregarding radio warnings. >>> the young pakistani girl who survived an assassination attempt by the taliban may not be going back to pakistan. 15-year-old malala yousufzai, who was shot in the head for speaking out for girls' education, could make britain her permanent home. her father is considering a job at the pakistani consulate. >>> and finally this morning, the white house is getting in the christmas spirit. first lady michelle obama and daughters, malia and sasha, received the christmas tree on friday, which arrived on a horse-drawn charge. it's from a farm in north carolina and will be displayed in the blue room. they have a head start on me. i'm notorious for putting up a tree on december 23rd. >> ours is december 26th. >> it stays up until like march. >> nice to see bo in that shot, too. did you see bo, the dog? >> just like the girls, he's huge. >> he's grown. >> alex, thank yo
now, despite the involvement of the united nations secretary-general and others, in trying to mediate, it looks like it could well turn into a ground operation, which the israelis have threatened within a matter of days. what are your -- what is your outlook? >> well, i think that certainly is a possibility, but, lou you have to step back from this. who supplies hamas? it is iran. and, you've got to look aa iran's role in the current conflict. certainly, egypt has a hand from morsi and his disastrous economic policy. but, what it has done for iran, it certainly has taken the iran nuclear issue off of the table. you can't even find it in the paper today. and, let's face it. iran has been at war with the united states for over 33 years, they conducted another act of war, just a week or so ago when they fired on our unmanned drone. as usual, we did not come forth to meet the challenge. >> lou: admiral, thank you very much and as you point out, the national media, not taking note of iran in this context. the conflict between israel and hamas. not taking note of the president's agenda and
. >>> susan rice, u.s. ambassador to the united nations speaking late today about her comments after the attack on the american consulate in benghazi in september, comments which john mccain would like to turn into the basis of a first giant confrontation between his republican party which he believes he speaks for on foreign policy. and the newly re-elected president obama. joining us bob, great to have you here. happy thanksgiving. >> great to be here, rachel. >> could susan rice be secretary of state if the president wanted her to be? is this sort of john mccain spectacle trying to make an example out of her over now? >> you know, i don't know if it is over. i think he is going to keep on trying. i personally don't think that mccain can block this appointment if the president decides to make it. you know, it is really weird. you watch these clips and you watch all the times that mccain has been wrong and it is almost like slapstick, like this kind of hapless approach to foreign policy. it would be really funny if it wasn't so tragic. because the republicans are not just wrong on f
in government circles. >> reporter: on his release, he will be given 34 lashes. this fall, the united nations human rights office declared that iranian authorities have embarked on a "severe clampdown" on journalists and human rights activists in a run-up to next june's iranian presidential elections. the iranian delegation to the u.n. dismissed the report as unfair and biased, and said the republic has worked wholeheartedly to realize the rights of its citizens. in an email to the newshour, the iranian u.n. mission claimed the report leveled "general allegations in the absence of authentic and reliable evidence aimed to serve propaganda." the communication also stated that political parties "enjoy the right of freedom of speech and free activities", and the iranians accused the u.s. of "a long list of gross and systematic violations of human rights, both at home and abroad." regime critics say they risk years in prison for their actions. abdolfattah soltani, an attorney and co-founder of the defenders of human rights center, tried to represent leaders of the minority b'hai faith. his daughte
they ended up killing one of the forces. palestinians are going to be protesting that to the united nations. but at the same time hamas also responded quickly. today they're keeping protesters away from the fence. they don't want any more of these kinds of clashes with israelis see as provocations. so i think it's clear both sides do want the cease-fire to continue. they both have a very strong vested interest in doing so. and that kind of incident yesterday, which led to the unfortunate death of one palestinian, i doubt that will be repeated in the days to come. the emphasis on both sides is going to be on the next stage, which as you mentioned, which is outlining the details, dealing with the details of what the cease-fire is, what it leads to. what they've got so far is what they've called quiet for quiet. both sides not shooting. what's next is the beginning of the negotiations. it's quite clear what the two sides want although it's going to appear complicated. it's simple and it's basic. hamas wants the lifting of the blockade of gaza. israel wants the end of weapons smuggled into gaza
. >> so it's not as if they're a united nations personnel monitoring this border crossing. >> no, it's a very surreal system where you actually don't run into any human beings for several steps of the process. it's all done through surveillance cameras, through doors being electronically opened for you and gradually, you know, as -- the closer you get with each door you go through, you're one step closer towards israel and one step -- they have examined you one step further. it's a fascinating system to see up close. >> yeah, but at some point, and you were there for what, three, four, five days? >> right. >> must have been scared out of your mind. >> you're definitely in a heightened state of awareness. i wouldn't say scared, because i've been in a lot of areas over the years. but it's always shocking to see the conditions that people are forced to live in, in a war zone. and to see what life is like for somebody who is the only difference between them and myself is the accident of birth and what zip code they were born into, and what -- that has determined what their life is like a
? ambassador is former ambassador to the united nations for special political affairs, are they better or worse now? >> they are in a process. president morsi's move was clearly an overreach. where they are now is negotiating a constitution. what opponents of morsi will say in shaping this constitution they will put in to place into effect a permanent of dominance for the muslim brotherhood. that is why they are so up in arms because they fought against mubarek for many years. >> gregg: isn't that what is happening here. he has usurped all power, he has pronounced these untouchables and new fair oh of egypt and they are calling him. tens of thousands have taken the street to denounce morsi and burning the offices of muslim brotherhood in two cities. where do you see this going, ambassador? >> there was broad support for mubarek after and many people in the streets of cairo and egypt think that the former regime got off lightly. with that said, i think there is a widespread ceiling they are entering a new phase in which the fundamental institutions and democratic protections are in jeopardy. tha
converted. we call it converting from post to park. repurposing those lands from national defense to environmental defense. and i believe it is probably the most accessful base conversion in the united states. if you haven't been to the presidio, i think you should try and make that. if you're from out of town, it's a spectacular transition there. so, these golden gate national parks that i happen to be the superintendent of has now become after 40 years the second most visited national park in our country. we get 14 million people a year that come to our parks. it has spectacular coastline, includes muir wood, alcatraz, we get to tell the stories, stories about essentially what you and your predecessors did this this area. our headquarters, fort mason, was the fisherman's wharf area was the port of embarkation for the wars in the pacific. just this week we brought in a world war ii 16-inch bottle ship gun to the marine head lands to put it up at battery townsly which would have been the pinnacle of coastal artillery in world war ii. so, we now have a canon or artillery collection
structural high rise code and practice and the third is redesigning each 348 residential units. just a small note on architecture. we conducted a national search for our architectural firm. we have a strong hire local bias but we have a strong need and desire to get the highest level of expertise available in esthetic design, in technical expertise and residential planning and the result of the search was a really good local firm who maybe known to you called handel architects. we have been working with them for a year. we are thrilled with the team work and the work that they have done and really pleased to be presenting the new design to you today by handel architects and with they would like to introduce glenda scal vo and one of the design principals and will walk you through the design and we are available for questions or comments you may have. >> good afternoon president fong and commissioners. thank you for having us here. we're very excited about -- >> excuse me. can you state your name for the record. >> glen scaff voa and partners in handel architects here in san francisco.
there was this notion that france and england would be a united union. they weren't calling it a country, but a national union. it would have two parliaments but one war cabinet, and every citizen of france would be a citizen of britain. churchill was a little skeptical at first, but then he went to the cabinet, and he said we can't be accused here of not having imagination, so let's, let's propose this. and it actually was, it was presented to the french cabinet but not all that seriously. by the time it came up, it was really too late. so france conducted a armistice with the germans and came to what we know as the agreement that sets up the government in the southern part of the country. the germans occupied the northern part, the northern two-thirds of the country along with all of the atlantic coast. and -- >> host: and, essentially, left in place the lower third, correct? >> guest: they wanted a government to govern that part of the country and also the colonies in north africa and southeast asia. they didn't want to be distracted by that. so part of the agreement was you set up this government --
nation. in 1857, there was an infamous decision and the united states supreme court confirmed the constitutional review. republicans, in contrast, never. the republicans would allow no more slaves in any territory. abraham lincoln was elected in november of 1860. a month later, the united states congress came into session. members of congress put forth various compromise proposals. a critical portion of all dealt with the divisions of territories. most often there was a proposal tuesday extended west beyond the louisiana purchase all the way to the border of california. now, after this preface, i'm going to get to my main point. when lincoln rejected all compromise with regard to territories. but there must be something more. i'm going to talk about three different men tonight. one of them, abraham lincoln, you know what he was and what he did. one of two americans, so well-known. the great kentucky statesman, henry clay, and william henry seward of new york state and prior to lincoln's nomination for the presidency was by far the most notable and well-known republican in the
down there and shows people how it's done, to be the united states' ambassador of medical care that wants to partner with these nations, learn about them, learn about their illnesses, learn about their afflictions and learn from the people in the area how we can better support and partner with them. build bridges before they have to. if we have had twice the number of aircraft carers in 9-11, if we had twice the number of marine battalions in 9-11, would that have stopped it? it would not have. but maybe, maybe through humanitarian assistance, disaster relief, global engagement, the ability for us it reach across borders and change minds, maybe the intelligence might have been forthcoming. maybe there was one individual who might have seen something happening and recognizing we can't let bad things happen. that is why we do this. one, we globally engage because it's the right thing to do. we are citizens of the world and we deserve to take care of those less fortunate than us. and we do it because we wapt to increase communications, we want to foster communication because
, the campaign to fix the national debt. and a petition filed by residents to secede from the united states. washington journal, with your phone calls, tweets, and e- mail's. >> we can remember barack obama's speech in 2004, the dazzling masterpiece that instantly makes him a national figure and four years later, the most honorable candidate for the presidency. lincoln is a dazzling speech in new york, it is a beautiful testament to the quality of his mind, the research he does, the logical argument. when he runs for the set that, barack obama gave the speech in 2004 running for the senate in illinois. abraham lincoln ran for the senate in illinois and he lost. if you want to think about abraham lincoln in 1860, think about barack obama running for the presidency in 2008. if he had lost the senate election, that is the level of national maturity we are talking about here. >> profiling historic and modern leaders to show the lessons that can be learned from those that have had the greatest impact on the issues of their time. sunday at 9:00 p.m. and midnight eastern part of the holiday weeken
which i do all the time by the way is, somehow wrong. it is a crime to enter the united states illegally. it is a federal crime. woe are a nation much laws. key i do fine the books as they stand. i'm not committing a hate crime by saying illegal aliens are just that. >> we are a nation of laws and we respect laws but we also respect humane laws. also seen in the past that laws thatin weren't humane have been changed. >> bill: then work to change them. don't demonize people who are accurate in the description as using a slur or using a hate word because it's not true. >> it's funny that you say it's inaccurate and all this. i think that we can take a page from foxag news latino who doesn't use the i word at all who has the policy that they will not join the bandwagon of people dehumanizing immigrants and using this language. >> bill: but i don't think i'm doing that i don't think i'm dehumanizing anybody by describing what the reality is. let me ask you a couple of questions about your belief system. do you believe we should have open borders here that anyonshe who comes to the united sta
as mexico, period. it's official name is the united mexican states. he has just a week left in office doesn't want his country to&├ębe imitate other nations. newspaper reports say some want to change the name to fraudland highlighting corruption in the calderon regime. >> a different photo finish. a man surprised his girlfriend >> disney characters like you've never seen them before. unusual holiday display that has gone up in a prominent store. >> how about this november display? sunny skies and a warm weather. i'll have the accu-weather forecast to let you know how long this will last. >> nice day to get outside. you're looking at the toll bridge and if you're heading into the city you're going to be backed up. stay with >>> it's time for heart warming surprises caught on camera thanksgiving day. >> love is in the air. old national turkey day 5 k in indiana chelsea reese broke down in tears after her long time boyfriend proposed at the finish line. friends and family held signs reading "will you marry me?" she said let me think bit. no. no. she said yes. >> there is not he anyone else i'm
to fix the national debt. then in the depositions to secede from the united states. we are joined by a georgetown university law professor. washington journal, live starting at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. but what soldiers now placed on century duty on the road in and out of boston and on guard outside the homes, officials and with british artillery now aimed at the town house of the general court, it is easy to understand why many boston residents felt threatened by the occupation. many he is how some soldiers try to stir up racial tensions in their town. not everyone in boston is white. for instance, with an -- within a month and there are rival, three british officers had been discovered encouraging some african american slaves in boston to attack their white masters. one of the stock officers assured these black bostonians that the soldiers were there to procure their freedom and that with their help and assistance, we should be able to drive all the liberty bowl is to the devil. while that slaves he talked to ignore these lies, the british army was not there to free the slav
coercion and that could lead them into a confrontation with the united states' desire to maintain free access. the best way of avoiding that military conflict is what we should see because the military conflict with china would be catastrophic for both nations, indeed for the whole region. so, we want to avoid that. i believe the best way of avoiding that is by maintaining a -- continuing to maintain a strong naval presence in the region, and by having an unambiguous commitment to doing that. i believe that our new national security strategy is that unambiguous commitment, and i believe that the u.s. navy is capable of maintaining that unambiguous military strength. as we sit here this morning aboard the uss macon island, in san francisco bay, looking out to the pacific, it is easy to believe that the united states is, in fact, a pacific power and that to keep it that way we will maintain the best damn navy in the world. thank you very much. (applause)speaker .... >> now i'm going to introduce our next speaker, major general melvin spee splt e i've known melvin for a number of years,
successfully at the sub national level. governments in the united states, governments in china that want to attract investment, often more than their national governments want to encourage it. perhaps we can use leverage to improve ipr performance at the regional level in china. i see real possibilities there. >> please join me in thinking this terrific panel. [applause] >> join us tonight for a look at the evolution of facebook with chris cox. he advises clarke ceo zucker byrd and talks about development -- ceo zuckerberg and talks about development. tomorrow on "washington journa l," cybersecurity threats. we're joined by a former navy seal and member of the council on foreign relations. that is followed by a look at labor unions. our guest is randi weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. and then later we will discuss drone strategy. "washington journal" live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> this week on "newsmakers," mary kay henry talks about what unions like the seiu are looking for. tomorow at 10:00 am and 6:00 p.m. eastern. >> what about if the soviet unio
believed -- lincoln fully believed if there were two nations in the middle of the north american continent, this war would not be the last. they said the reason the united states had not been written by the wars that affected europe for centuries was there was a single country. once there are two countries in north america, they will go at it again so this war would not be the last and in the long run even 600,000 lives, this might be a bargaining human suffering. >> questions from the audience? we will start over here. [inaudible] >> is there a microphone he could use? i am sorry. >> is the microphone working? good deal. we are all talking, we were wondering when you were going to get to the part about what we all believe in the southern part of the united states, how he was a drunk and a corrupt politician. you are contradicting much of that. you came to different conclusions, did you? >> i did the. i will give you grant's reputation. for years he was a drunk and a butcher and his administration was one of the most corrupt in american history. historians rating presidents until the begin
in the sense that it gives middle easterners of whatever background and awareness that the united states has a humanitarian presence in the middle east. it has not always been about the cultivation of military forces for national security. americans have been there for 150 years giving to the nation in practical and beneficial ways for the people, not just for us. but that is why i wrote the book. i wanted them to know that not one and i wanted the american people to know that story. >> who was malcolm kerr current? >> he was a professor at ucla who left the year before i arrived work on my phd. he had grown up in beirut. though he had made a very distinguished career for himself as a scholar of the middle east, he went home in the early
defenses against that. >> miss yeager, i don't know if you want to say anything from a national guard perspective. >> we have some mobile explorable platforms we can send out to incidents to help provide additional infrastructure in the event everything breaks down then our units have organic communications capability so i can move that out and i can help reinforce cal fire on their incident with what i have in the aviation brigade and units through the state of california have that same communication but the iceu, which is a mobile communications platform, is ideal in events like this to push out to help. >> any other questions? >> i have one. back in 1992 when it was a big fire season and there was a lot of grass, they came to us and i was down at camp pendleton and they asked us it train marines on shovel work. what happened about 6 months later, they ended up sending two battalions to yellowstone. i haven't heard any discussion at all, do you expect the military, the guard or the active forces to be training people to do shovel-like work? all you have talked about so far is av
purposes except protect purposes, in switzerland interestingly there is a huge national revolt against the superrich and don't pay a high tax rate. there are similar tensions in but terror is certainly a more extreme dynamic in the united states. >> which u.s. government policies in your view perpetuate the transfer of wealth between the middle class and the top 1%, and could you rank them in importance including for example -- >> that would take all night. >> please address and include the tax equity, inequities between herndon come, and capital gains, the federal reserve policy of low interest rates, the emphasis on spending rather than saving, the reward given to borrowers rather than savers. >> from that famous line in when harry met sally, i will have what she had and the ones i would single out, because it is so egregious to carry interest treatment. i find that amazing and i find amazing that four years of a democratic president still hasn't managed to roll that back. how can that be? and .2 i find amazing i have yet to talk to a private equity person now that how liberal and so
of the nation's most respected judges, legal scholars, lawyers, and policy analysts. the marquee event is tonight's program. the namesake of tonight's lecturer became the youngest associate justice ever to serve on united states supreme court when he was appointed by president madison in 1812. he made a significant mark on american law in his 33 years on the bench, but his greatest contribution is is renowned commentaries on the constitution. justice story a famously and correctly declared "a constitutional government is addressed to the common sense of the people and never was designed for trials of logical skills or visionary speculation." this lecture series celebrates his legacy in the law. prior lectures have been judge robert bork, professor john harrison, judge raymond randolph, and chief justice of the united states court of appeals of the sixth circuit. tonight, we're honored to add a fifth name to that prestigious list as a welcome justice anthony kennedy. justice kennedy received his bachelor of arts degree from stanford university and the london school of economics and his
so weaken the nation, that it would be very, very prone to of foreign involvement, the british were still in canada, obviously. there were certainly foreign threats that are weakened and divided united states would have been prone to. on to the second question, which is about social media and lincoln. first of all, there was plenty of social media in 1861-1865 because it was the era in which mass communications was available. the telegraph, the railroad, the newspaper or all becoming much more prevalent. many more americans were littered and reading newspapers, so people were seeing and hearing about the carnage of the war every single day. the telegraph offices would be filled with the casualty report. the other thing that changed very, very radically was that this was also the first american war that was photographed, and people were seeing photographs of the carnage. the new york times in a very, very famous review of mathew brady studio putting up a display of war scenes said that the photograph had brought the war into living rooms. so i think that certainly wasn't as prevalent
the canadian nation, that this might not have been a victory for either the unite or great britain, but -- the united states or great britain, but canada regards it as a victory for them. they turned back american invasion efforts, and after the 1812 war from then til now, there's never been a cross-border conflict. >> i can confirm that. i'm an american who spent a good part of my youth in canada, went to school there. and, yes, it's very much a source of canadian pride that the americans were beaten. [laughter] >> thank you for that. yes. >> i went to school in australia, and we had detailed history of the revolution, boston tea party and so on. and then of the american civil war. we knew almost everything about that. we had the battle of antitee tunnel and gettysburg and so on. into when i came here in 1957, i found i really knew a lot more about the revolution and the civil war than colleagues here, students and academics. but we never heard a word about the war of 1812. it was not mentioned, and it was not in our history. any idea why that should be? >> the speaker noted that
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)